Wisconsin Assembly top Republican looks to work with governor on abortion, school choice, tax cuts

(The Center Square) – The top Republican in the Wisconsin Assembly says he’s willing to work on “solutions” with Gov. Tony Evers.

Speaker Robin Vos on Thursday said he sees Republicans offering the governor compromises on abortion, school choice and taxes.

“I think when you look at where we are, we need to make some potential changes to the 1849 [abortion] law. One of the things that I want to make sure of is that we have a law that can withstand court challenges,” Vos told News Talk 1130 WISN’s Jay Weber Thursday morning. “When Tony Evers said he wouldn’t even consider making exceptions for rape and incest because he wants radical, up until birth abortion laws, let’s put something in front of him and see if he really believes that.”

The governor said during the recent campaign that he wouldn’t sign an abortion exemption law because it would continue to ban most abortions in the state.

Many other Republicans in the legislature have said they have no plans to change Wisconsin’s abortion law, including the leader of the state Senate.

Vos also said he could see offering the governor a compromise on school choice.

“I want universal school choice, he wants more money for schools,” Vos explained. “That probably means we get both. We’re probably not going to do one or the other.”

Vos sees the same kind of possible agreement on taxes.

“He wants more money for government, I want more money in the hands of the people,” Vos added. “Maybe we can find a way to thread the needle, with most of the surplus going back to people but some of it going back to law enforcement at the local level. I think there should be things that we can find consensus on.”

Vos did warn that it could take a while to find a balance with the governor.

Gov. Evers bragged during his campaign about blocking Republican ideas. Evers vetoed more pieces of legislation, nearly 150 pieces, than any other governor in state history.

During his victory speech Tuesday, Evers hinted that he wants to invest more in public schools in the state and focus on climate change and green energy during his second term.

Lawmakers return to the Capitol for a new session in January.