Holocaust & Humanity Center in Ohio fighting explosion of antisemitism with education  

A Holocaust museum in Ohio is using education to halt the spread of antisemitism since the Oct. 7 attack on Israel. 

The Nancy and David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center in Cincinnati is…

A Holocaust museum in Ohio is using education to halt the spread of antisemitism since the Oct. 7 attack on Israel. 

The Nancy and David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center in Cincinnati is offering free admission throughout January, hoping people will visit and learn more about Jewish history, according to WLWT News 5.  

Jackie Congedo, chief community engagement and external affairs officer for the museum, explained some of the “alarming incidents” occurring at the center’s door, and all over the world.  

“On the street, at synagogues, universities, restaurants, businesses and, yes, even Holocaust museums,” Congedo said according to WLWT News 5. “Right here in Cincinnati, chants of death to Jews in our schools. Students telling their Jewish classmates that ‘Hitler should have finished the job.’ Nazi salutes and swastikas drawn in school bathrooms, among many other alarming incidents.”  

More than two dozen Cincinnati Public Schools students protested outside of City Hall in December, condemning not the savage attack on Israelis but the subsequent deaths of Palestinians. Some students held signs reading “Free Palestine,” “Stop the Occupation” and “Stop Funding Genocide,” according to WCPO.  

Local Rabbi Yosef Kalmanson said the students’ words were misguided and disheartening, arguing the Israel military was acting solely in self-defense.  

“Any sovereign country should absolutely be there to protect the safety and security of its citizens,” Kalmanson said. “The issue at hand is what does Israel have to do to assure the security of its citizens – and this is the only way it sees to do it, would be to eradicate Hamas.” 

The museum is inviting people to come there and observe Holocaust Remembrance Day on Jan. 27 to help combat the growing ignorance surrounding the Holocaust. Area  

“One recent study showed 1 in 5 young Americans think that the Holocaust was a myth,” Congedo said, according to WLWT News 5. “Another study showed that more than 1 in 10 Americans believe the outlandish lie that Jews caused the Holocaust.” 

Congedo hopes the museum can teach its visitors humanity.  

“Just as hatred can be taught, so too can humanity,” Congedo said. “And our museum is designed to do just that.”  

A bipartisan group of U.S. senators, led by Sen. Jacky Rosen, introduced a bill Friday to extend the Never Again Education Act, providing federal funding for Holocaust education. The current law is set to end in 2025.  

“Failing to educate students about the gravity and scope of the Holocaust is a disservice to the memory of its victims and to our duty to prevent such atrocities in the future,” Rosen wrote in a statement. “At a time of rising antisemitism, reauthorizing the bipartisan Never Again Education Act will help ensure that educators have the resources needed to teach students about the Holocaust and help counter antisemitic bigotry and hate.”